Biosemiotics

 

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What is horizontal gene transfer and viral replication?

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Biosemiotics

encompasses  all  levels  of  sign-processes,  even  fundamental  units,  such  as  a  protein  or  a  molecule.   As  a  new  information  science,  biosemiotics  is  the  key  to  understanding  the  confusing  corpus  of  Ancient  Egyptian  funerary  texts,  other  mythologies,  religion  and  the  origin  of  the  work  of  art.

 

To  survive  as  a  species,  we  need  to  interpret   signs  correctly.  Pharaonic  biopower   understood  the  meaning  of  their   biological  signs,  which  they  inscribed  in  their  pyramids  and  tombs.    But  modern  man  does  not.

 

Scientists  currently  believe  that  we  are  locked  into  our  species  because  we  have  no  genetic  flexibility.   This  is  because  we  are  only  able  to  trade  genes  during  sexual  reproduction,  that  is  vertically,  whereas  bacteria  can  trade  them  horizontally.  As  Margulis and Sagan  write  in  their  book  Microcosmos:

"The  result  is  that  while  genetically   fluid   bacteria  are   functionally   immortal,   in  eukaryotes  [our cell type] ,  sex   becomes  linked   with  death." 

 

The  Egyptian  message  is  that  humans  are  not  locked  into  our  species.  We  have  genetic  flexibility  at  death  through  horizontal  gene  transfer.

 

The  Isis  Thesis  decodes  the  biological  signs  of  the  Pharaohs,  who  mapped  a  specific  pathway,  using  the  earth  and  stars  as  guides,  for   horizontal  gene  transfer  and  evolvability  (evolution  of  an  evolved  species)    

 

See the British Journal Nature's focus on horizontal gene transfer HERE  for more information

 

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